Video Review: Art Nouveau and the Origins of 1960s Psychedelic Art

When I saw the above YouTube video, I was very impressed and fascinated with the way they approached the subject, but as someone who enjoys learning new things, I especially appreciated the fact that this was something I never knew before. So, in this blog entry, I wanted to highlight the video but also share a few of my thoughts on it.

Before I begin, I'd like to give a shout-out to the Vox channel on YouTube. I highly recommend Vox for those among you who are curious about a variety of topics. They don't just do art videos like this one, but they also talk about politics, history, pop culture, and so on and so forth. And for animation enthusiasts, these videos boast some of the best motion graphics I've seen on YouTube.

But now back to the topic at hand: The opening of the video is effective in that, after it shows us the psychedelic posters, it immediately draws us in by telling us that these designs weren't originally created in the '60s--but almost a century before.

Another thing I liked about this video was that it draws a direct parallel between the culture of the late 1800s and that of the 1960s, explaining how both these eras of social, technological, and cultural upheaval spawned Art Nouveau and psychedelic art respectively.

They included many other interesting tidbits, such as 1967's Summer of Love in San Francisco, famous psychedelic designers such as Wes Wilson, etc., as well as the Jugendstil Expressionism exhibit just outside San Francisco, where those designers supposedly got their inspiration.

If you haven't watched this video, I encourage you to do so, and, as always, please let me know what you thought of it in the comments section below.

I look forward to our discussion.



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